Vanessa Place

Performative Criticism and Against Conceptual Poetry

Ron Silliman

I recently participated in a panel discussion on the topic of performative criticism at REVERSE, the Copenhagen International Poetry Festival held at their LiteraturHaus. My co-panelists were Danish-Norwegian critic Susanne Christensen, Swedish critic and poet Magnus William-Olsson, and Danish writer Kamilla Löftström. The conversation was…

Seascape

Heimrad Bäcker

Translation by Patrick Greaney Afterword by Charles Bernstein Have you ever killed anyone? This was the question a journalist recently reported asking a convicted serial killer. Not to drag biography into it, but criminal lawyers know better than to ask such stupid questions. For, not…

What Makes Us

Seven American Deaths and Disasters Kenneth Goldsmith powerHouse Books, 2013 Manchester: August 16th & 17th 1819 John Seed Intercapillary Editions, 2013 As Marjorie Perloff has repeatedly noted, much of contemporary lyric poetry is prose by another name—there is nothing beyond lineation that commends it to…

The Epic Post-Easter Basket

Joey Yearous-Algozin

The Epic Post-Easter Basket: The title of none of Joey Yearsus-Algozin’s works under consideration, all of which may be found here: at the Troll Thread Collective. Recently, which is where I left my glasses, I wrote a small note for Harriet* about what I’ve been…

Motes

Craig Dworkin

Motes is a perfect little book of poetry. “Little” book, not by way of diminution, but as large praise, for Dworkin’s work here is of a piece, and each small piece is prism-pure in its exactitude. And exactitude, as is its way, is a matter…

Panda

Chris Alexander

Like any good conceptual work, the description of Panda (KFP) by Chris Alexander can be taken at its website-word: Two and a half years in the making, this book-length poem assembles thousands of fan responses, brief summaries and descriptions of the title character from DreamWorks…

Money Shot

Rae Armantrout

There is great and there is graceful. One does not always lead to or implicate the other, and there is the danger of de trop in both. For that matter, a poet should not be great, for greatness, or, for that matter, grace, can only…