Karla Kelsey

The Gray Notebook

Alexander Vvedensky

The Gray Notebook did not originate as a book of poetry. Rather, it was, literally, a gray notebook that Russian avant-garde writer, Alexander Vvedensky, kept from 1932-1933. At 17 pages long (excluding the endpapers, a “Translator’s Note,” and the colophon which brings the published version…

R’s Boat

Lisa Robertson

Michel de Certeau dedicates his multi-disciplinary work of theory, The Practice of Everyday Life, to “the ordinary man. The common hero, an ubiquitous character, walking in countless thousands on the streets”—and then launches into an assessment of the place and circumstances of everyday man’s everyday…

Mean Free Path

Ben Lerner

The phrase “mean free path” belongs to the nomenclature of physics and designates the average distance covered by a particle or wave between successive impacts. Mean Free Path also names Ben Lerner’s third book of poetry just out from Copper Canyon Press. The transposition of…

Lost Alphabet

Lisa Olstein

In his 1939 lecture, “Poetry and Abstract Thought,” Paul Valéry famously fleshes out the analogy between walking and prose, dancing and poetry. Prose is like walking in that it has “a definite aim. It is an act directed at something we wish to reach.” Poetry,…